Phrasal Verbs with OUT

Phrasal Verbs with OUT
ASK OUT
(separable) to request someone to go on a date with you
I asked Mary out again. She refused.

BAIL OUT
(intransitive) to jump out of an airplane (usually when it?s going to crash)
Luckily the pilot bailed out before his plane hit the side of the mountain.

BAIL OUT
(intransitive) to quit or stop doing something (usually when experiencing difficulties)
The congressional candidate bailed out of the race because there was no hope that he could raise enough money to win.

BAIL OUT
(separable) to rescue someone from a difficult situation
Max?s uncle bailed him out of the financial problems he was having.

BLACK OUT
(intransitive) to lose consciousness momentarily
Max had a very severe headache and blacked out several times, so his doctor admitted him to the hospital.

BREAK OUT
(intransitive) to suddenly develop or erupt
A riot broke out in Los Angeles today.

CHICKEN OUT
(intransitive) not to do something because of fear
Max wanted to ask Mary out on a date, but he chickened out.

COME OUT
(intransitive) to become known, to come into public view, to debut
The news of the candidates past sexual misconduct came out just before the election.

COME OUT
(intransitive) to turn out, result
Everything came out fine in the end

COME OUT
(intransitive) to declare one?s position publicly
The senator came out against gay marriage.

COME OUT
(intransitive) to reveal that oneself as homosexual
After years of trying to act straight, Max finally came out.

CROSS OUT
(separable) to draw a line through something
I didn?t have an eraser, so I had to cross out my mistakes instead.

DISH OUT
(separable) to allocate, dispense, or distribute food from a container
After dinner, Max dished out some delicious fruit salad for desert.

DROWN OUT
(separable) to make a sound inaudible with a louder sound
Max uses his iPod to drown out all of the people?s voices around him.

EAT OUT
(intransitive) to go out to a restaurant to eat
Max was tired of eating out, so he stayed home and had a TV dinner.

EMPTY OUT
(separable) to remove everything from a container making it empty
Max emptied the refrigerator out.

EMPTY OUT
(intransitive) to be vacated by people
The concert hall emptied out as soon as the concert was over.

EVEN OUT
(separable) to make something measure the same as something else
Max has trouble evening out his sideburns since one ear is lower than the other.

FIND OUT
(separable) to learn or discover
Mary was mad when she found out that she was adopted.

GET OUT
(intransitive) to become known
The news about Mary got out very quickly.

GET OUT
(intransitive) to escape or leave
Sam wouldn’t stop talking so we asked him to get out.

GET OUT
(separable) cause to escape or leave
Please get that cat out of here.

GIVE OUT
(inseparable) to distribute
Mary is very happy that they give needles out at the local clinic.

HAND OUT
(separable) to distribute
Lee Harvey often handed out leaflets on the street corner.

KICK OUT
(separable) to force to leave
The bouncers kicked Max out of the bar for starting a fight.

KNOCK OUT
(intransitive) to make someone unconscious
That last drink I had really knocked me out.

LEAVE OUT
(separable) to not include
A margarita is not a margarita if you leave the tequila out.

LOCK OUT
(separable) to lock the door so that someone can’t enter
Jane locked Jack out of the bathroom because she wanted some privacy.

LOOK OUT
(intransitive) to be careful; watchful; to protect someone’s interests
Most politicians just look out for themselves and their wealthy constituents. They have little regard for the average person.

PASS OUT
(intransitive) to lose consciousness
Mary was so tired that she passed out as soon as she got home.

PASS OUT
(separable) to distribute
The teacher passed the assignment out.

PICK OUT
(separable) to choose
When shopping for watermelon, I like to pick out the biggest.

PRINT OUT
(separable) to print something from a computer
I need to buy some more paper for my printer so that I can print out my report for history class.

PUT OUT
(separable) to extinguish
The firefighters put the fire out.

PUT OUT
(separable) to publish; issue
The government put out a news brief to misinform the public.

PUT OUT
(separable) to exert, extend
The workers put out considerable effort to get the job done on time.

PUT OUT
(separable) to expel
Please put the cat out.

RENT OUT
(separable) to grant temporary use or occupancy in exchange for payment
Max rents one of the rooms in house out to make a little extra money.

RUSH OUT
(intransitive) to exit quickly
The workers all rushed out because it was time to go home.

SELL OUT
(separable) to compromise one’s values for personal gain
Catherine sold out. I guess power and money mean more to her than what she said were her personal values.

SELL OUT
(separable) to sell everything in the store
We can’t go to the concert. The tickets have been sold out

SHOUT OUT
(separable) to speak very loudly; to announce
Max shouted the directions to his house out.

SORT OUT
(separable) to arrange or separate by type, class, category, etc.
Max sorted his socks out.

SORT OUT
(separable) to resolve problems or difficulties
Max tried to sort out the misunderstanding he had with Mary.

STAND OUT
(intransitive) to be prominent or conspicuous
Max’s car stands out among all of the cars in the parking lot because of its florescent green paintjob.

STAY OUT
(intransitive) to not return home past the regular time
Bill got angry when his wife stayed out all night.

TAKE OUT
(separable) to take someone on a date
Max took Mary out to a fancy restaurant.

TAKE OUT
(separable) to extract; remove
Max takes out the trash every night.

THAW OUT
(intransitive) to change from a frozen state to a non-frozen state
The ice-covered lakes thaw out in the springtime.

THAW OUT
(separable) to cause something to change from a frozen state to a non-frozen state by warming it
The warm sun thawed out the icy sidewalk.

THROW OUT
(separable) to discard
Mary threw out all of her old clothes.

TRY OUT
(separable) to test to see if something is suitable
I’m going to try out some new recipes for dinner this week.

TURN OUT
(separable) to switch off
Please turn out the lights.

WALK OUT
(intransitive) to leave as a sign of protest
The workers walked out to protest the low wages.

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